Moving In

Checklists for landlords and tenants beginning a tenancy.

Moving in checklist for tenants

Photographs

It is a good idea to take photographs of the property before the commencement of a new tenancy, and if possible date them.  Similarly, photos should be taken before moving out of the dwelling. This is important should a dispute arise regarding the condition of the property when the tenancy ends  

Who is the landlord?

It is important to know the name of the landlord.  If dealing with an agent, a tenant is entitled to the full name and contact details of the landlord(s) under the Housing Rent Book Regulations Act 1993.  Even if dealing with an agent or landlord representative throughout a tenancy, in the event of a dispute, the tenant can only refer an application for dispute resolution against the landlord. Check the RTB database of dispute resolution outcomes here.

Leaving early?

In general in the first six months of a tenancy the landlord or tenant can terminate without a reason but this cannot be done in a fixed term tenancy. Tenants cannot terminate a fixed term lease unless the landlord has not agreed to assign or sublet the tenancy.

Rights and responsibilities

Tenants and landlords should be familiar with their rights and responsibilities. Click here for more information on rights and responsibilities.

Contact details

The landlord should provide the tenant with their contact details or the contact details of any agent working on their behalf.

Check RTB database of dispute outcomes

We recommend that tenants and landlords search the RTB database for all dispute outcomes before renting a property.

Moving in checklist for landlords 

Photographs

It is a good idea to take photographs of the property before the commencement of a new tenancy, and if possible to date them.  Similarly, photos should be taken of the property before the tenant moves out. This is important should an issue arise regarding the condition of the property when the tenancy ends.  

PPS number

It is really important to obtain a tenant’s PPS number before a tenancy commences.  A PPS number is a unique identifier, and in the event of a dispute, the RTB will have an improved chance of tracing a tenant(s) address if a PPS number is supplied. Without a PPS number, the RTB may not be able to locate the tenant and may not be in a position to process your dispute.  

References

A landlord should check a tenant’s references:

  • Landlords should search the RTB website for all dispute outcomes involving tenants before renting out their property
  • Landlords should be familiar with their rights and responsibilities as well as those of their tenant(s). 
  • Landlords should provide the tenant(s) with their contact details or those of the agent.
  • Landlords should get the tenant(s) contact details.
  • Check out Revenue.ie to get further information on taxation implications on rental income and deductions.  

Rent Pressure Zones

In the case of a new tenancy in a rent pressure zone, a landlord is required to  furnish the tenant, in writing, with the following information at the commencement of the tenancy:

(i)   The amount of rent that was last set under a tenancy for the dwelling;
(ii)  The date the rent was last set under a tenancy for the dwelling;
(iii) A statement as to how the rent set under the tenancy of the dwelling has been calculated having regard to the rent pressure zone formula.

See here for more information on setting rent in Rent Pressure Zones.

 

Exemptions to the Rent Pressure Zone rental cap

  • Not all rental properties in Rent Pressure Zones are subject to a rental restriction
  • Not all properties in Rent Pressure Zones are covered by the 4% annual rental cap. properties exempt include those that are:
  • New to the rental market and have not been let at any time in the previous two years, and that have undergone a substantial change.
  • A ‘substantial refurbishment’ must be a significant change or improvement  to the dwelling which results in increased market value of the tenancy and therefore adds to the letting value of the property. The substantial refurbishment must have resulted in the property increasing its letting value. For example, simple repainting or replacement of white goods would not be sufficient.

The RTB, with the Department of Housing, are preparing guidance on ‘substantial refurbishment’ to be issued shortly.